Plate Tectonics: An Insider’s History Of The Modern Theory Of The Earth
Book Reviews / May 12, 2016

Title: Plate Tectonics: An Insider’s History Of The Modern Theory Of The Earth Author: Naomi Oreskes Date/Year:  January 20, 2003 (Westview Press) Format: Paperback and Hardcove Language: English Reviewer: cartonaut We rely on coordinates, often using them as an absolute fixed location. But we often don’t add time nor recognize the fact that the ground is not fixed while the coordinate is. I live in Sonoma County, California. The part of the North American Plate upon which Sonoma County rides moves on average about 2 centimeters a year north at a velocity a little slower than the rotating edge of the Pacific Plate to my west (west of the San Andreas Fault) which is moving north around 10 centimeters a year. The rest of the North American Plate (roughly the part west of Nevada) moves about 2 centimeters a year to the west-southwest That means that the coordinates for my desk chair are about four feet north of that location’s coordinates when I was born (in that time we’ve also invented and accepted the concept of Plate Tectonics). Also a noticeable shift in my life time in the location of the parcel that the chair sits inside…more than my outstretched arms, more than the…

MAP: Exploring the world
Book Reviews / October 12, 2015

Title: MAP: Exploring the world Author: Phaidon Press Limited Date/Year: September 28, 2015 Format: Hardcover, 10.2 inches wide x 11.8 inches wide  x 1.5 inches thick Language: English (French is available through pre-order from Phaidon) Reviewer: cartonaut Phaidon Press Limited worked long and hard to compact a broad topic into a rolling visual summary of cartography with 300 maps and timeline. After a well written intro by John Hessler (Specialist in Modern Cartography and Geographic Information Science Geography and Map Division at the Library of Congress) the book begins with two facing geographic stories of the exaggerated perspective of the United States by a “New Yorker” told 37 years apart. Essentially cartograms of ego, they distort into cartographic hyperbole. The vantage of these initial maps are analogous to the rest of the book. We look at the history of maps from the perspective of a satellite, remotely sensing from a high altitude into the past and also from a foreshortened and compressed subjectivity from our place in time. This is a large book, so these maps and their detail are reproduced well. The color quality and resolution is greatly appreciated. However, those readers captivated by the detail of maps that were originally 6 feet in size will be…